Herald-Journal_269791

✁✁✂✁✄✂☎✆ ✝ ✞✟✠✂☎✡ ✝ ☛✡☞✂✌✡ ✝ ✍✂✎✏✑✁ ✝ ✍✂✒✒✆☎ ✝ ✍✆☎✂✁✡ ✝ ✓☎✆✁✔✡✆ ✝ ✕✡✏✂✎✄ ✖✂☞✆ ✝ ✕✟✌✔✗✑✁✒✡✁ ✝ ✘✑✙✚✂☎☎ ✝ ✖✆✒✌✆✎ ✛✎✂✑✎✑✆ ✖✑✌✔✗✜✆☎✄ ✝ ✖✡✎✆✌✌✡ ✝ ✢✂✣☎✆ ✖✂☞✆ ✝ ✢✂✣☎✆ ✛☎✂✑✁ ✝ ✢✂✤✆✎ ✝ ✢✡✁✌✎✡✒✆ ✝ ✢✡✟✁✄ ✝ ✥✆✏ ✓✆✎✙✂✁✤ ✝ ✥✡✎✏✡✡✄ ✦✡✟✁✧ ✙✆✎✑✔✂ ★✡✔☞✩✡✎✄ ✝ ✪✑☎✫✆✎ ✖✂☞✆ ✝ ✪✡✟✌✗ ✕✂✫✆✁ ✝ ✪✌✬ ✞✡✁✑✩✂✔✑✟✒ ✝ ✭✂✔✡✁✑✂ ✝ ✭✂✌✆✎✌✡✏✁ ✝ ✭✂✫✆✎☎✤ ✝ ✭✑✁✒✌✆✄ Senior Con n e c t ion s is distributed to: March/April 2022 VOLUME 4 | NO. 2 Senior Con n e ct ion s HJ.COM ❇❨ ✮❚❊❱❊ ✯❘■◆✮❊◆ ❉❡❧✰♥✱ ✲❡r✰❧❞ ✳✱♦r♥✰❧ ✴❞✐t✱r The Delano Senior Center is not your grandparent’s senior center, and it hasn’t been for a long time. Delano’s Se- nior Center, located at city hall, serves up to 3,000 people annually, and while most are seniors, they are all ages. Pre-pandemic, during the pandemic and hopefully coming out of the pan- demic the center had continued to ser- vice a large clientele from the greater Delano area. “Seniors have changed,’ Nick Neaton, the center’s director, said recently. “Thirty years ago people wanted to come down and eat meat and potatoes every day, at noon, and it didn’t matter what was on the menu. They had this audience that came. We knew it was going to change, and it has changed, so you have to tailor it to a new audience.” Today’s seniors are an active group, and the number of events and activi- ✵✶✷✸ ✹✵ ✵✺✷ ✻✷✼✵✷✽ ✽✷✾✷✻✵✸ ✵✺✹✵✿ ❀❁❂✷❃✷✽❄ while it may be a senior center in name, ✶✵✸ ❁❅✷✽✶✼❆✸ ✹✽✷ ❁❈✷✼ ✵❁ ✹❋❋ ✹❆✷✸❄ ❂✶✵✺ the exception of just one program, the 55-plus driving program. Delano’s Senior Center has a histo- ry of investment by the city, excellent programs, strong leadership and large numbers of volunteers that make the ✻✷✼✵✷✽ ✹ ✸●✻✻✷✸✸❄ ❍✷✹✵❁✼ ✸✹✶❏✿ ❀✷ ✺✹✸ been with the city since June 2014 when he was hired by the City of Del- ano as the Senior Center’s coordinator. Today his job as Community Service Director encompasses more than the center, but he is quick to point out that Delano’s commitment to seniors start- ✷❏ ❑❁✽✷ ✵✺✹✼ ▲▼ ❖✷✹✽✸ ✹❆❁✿ ❀✷ ✶✸ ✵✺✷ center’s second full-time director. Supporting seniors “It’s the culture that we have here,” Neaton said, speaking of the center’s success. “It’s the city saying this is a priority that we support. We’re going to give you the resources necessary to do the job and provide things. When you do that, you get good results. When you have good facilities to work with, when you have the tools, you have great re- sults,” he said. Delano City Administrator Phil Kern agreed. “The investment and the histo- ry goes back a long time. The commu- nity initiated it. They wanted to make it what’s it’s become, and the city has ✸●❈❈❁✽✵✷❏ ✶✵✿ P✷ ✺✹❃✷ ✹ ✵✹❋✷✼✵✷❏ ✸✵✹❅❄ active seniors and volunteers. The com- munity is very proud of it.” The center receives most of its funding through the city but also gets funding from surrounding townships and communities that don’t provide as many services as Delano. Besides Neaton, Linda Van Lith is the center’s ✹✸✸✶✸✵✹✼✵ ✻❁❁✽❏✶✼✹✵❁✽❄ ✹✼❏ ◗✷✽✽✶ ❀✹✽✽✶✸ serves as the kitchen manager. While the center may charge a nomi- nal, suggested fee for its lunch, $5, and some other activities, Neaton and the ✻✶✵❖ ❂✽✶✵✷ ❆✽✹✼✵✸ ❙❁✽ ✸❈✷✻✶❯✻ ❁❲❳✷✻✵✶❃✷✸ but also relies on a number of partner- ships with organizations and business- es to service up to about 3,000 people a year. Delano’s Senior Center has wide reach ❩❬❭❪❭ ❫❴ ❵❪❛❜❛ ❩❝❢❣❵❛❣ ❤❥♠ ❦❥s♣q✉✈ sq✇①q② ✇③② ❤❥♠ ④✇⑤s ♣✇② ⑥⑤③⑦♣ ✇① ①♣q ⑦q③①q✉ ✉q⑦q③①⑥⑧⑨ ❦❥s♣q✉ ⑦⑩♠qs ❶✉⑩♠ ④⑩③①✉⑩sq ✇③② ④✇✇s ❶✉⑩♠ ④✇❷⑥q ❸⑥✇❥③⑨ ❹♣q ⑦q③①q✉ sq✉❺qs ⑦⑥❥q③①s ❶✉⑩♠ ✇✉⑩⑤③② ①♣q ✇✉q✇⑨ ❻❼❽❾ ❿➀➁➂➃➄ ➅➀➁➆➀➄ ❼➇ ➈➉ ➊

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